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Probing the Connection between Real-Time Strategy Games, Brain White Matter & Learning Performance

Updated: Jul 31, 2023



The study published in Scientific Reports investigates the relationship between real-time strategy video game learning outcomes and pre-training brain white matter structure. The authors used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to measure the white matter structure of participants before they played a real-time strategy video game and after they completed a training program for the game. The study found that the pre-training white matter structure in certain regions of the brain was associated with the learning outcomes of the game.


The article was corrected by the authors, and the corrected version provides more accurate information about the study's findings. The original version of the article contained an error, which was corrected in the author correction. The correction was made to the Results section of the article, where the authors mistakenly reported that there was a significant correlation between pre-training fractional anisotropy (FA) in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and post-training game performance.


The correction states that this correlation was not significant, and that the significant correlation was actually between pre-training FA in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) and post-training game performance.The study was also published on ResearchGate and X-MOL. Additionally, an article on the study was published on the SWPS University website. The article provides a summary of the study's findings and discusses the potential implications of the research for cognitive training and rehabilitation.


The study's findings suggest that pre-training white matter structure in certain regions of the brain may be associated with the ability to learn and improve at real-time strategy video games. Specifically, the study found that pre-training FA in the left IFOF was significantly correlated with post-training game performance. The IFOF is a white matter tract that connects the frontal and occipital lobes of the brain, and is involved in visual processing and attention. The authors suggest that the IFOF may play a role in the cognitive processes involved in real-time strategy video game performance, such as attentional control and spatial reasoning.


The study's findings have potential implications for cognitive training and rehabilitation. The authors suggest that the relationship between pre-training white matter structure and video game learning outcomes could be used to develop targeted cognitive training programs. For example, individuals with weaker white matter structure in the IFOF could benefit from training programs that specifically target attentional control and spatial reasoning. Additionally, the findings could be used to develop rehabilitation programs for individuals with brain injuries or neurological disorders that affect white matter structure.


Overall, the study provides valuable insight into the relationship between brain structure and video game learning outcomes. The study's findings suggest that pre-training white matter structure in certain regions of the brain may be associated with the ability to learn and improve at real-time strategy video games. The authors suggest that further research is needed to confirm these findings and to explore the potential implications for cognitive training and rehabilitation.


Some key takeaways from the study include:

  • The study investigated the relationship between real-time strategy video game learning outcomes and pre-training brain white matter structure.

  • The authors used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to measure the white matter structure of participants before they played a real-time strategy video game and after they completed a training program for the game.

  • The study found that the pre-training white matter structure in certain regions of the brain was associated with the learning outcomes of the game.

  • The correction made to the article by the authors provides more accurate information about the study's findings, specifically regarding the correlation between pre-training FA in the left IFOF and post-training game performance.

  • The study's findings suggest that pre-training white matter structure in certain regions of the brain may be associated with the ability to learn and improve at real-time strategy video games.

  • The IFOF is a white matter tract that connects the frontal and occipital lobes of the brain, and is involved in visual processing and attention.

  • The authors suggest that the IFOF may play a role in the cognitive processes involved in real-time strategy video game performance, such as attentional control and spatial reasoning.

  • The study's findings have potential implications for cognitive training and rehabilitation, and could be used to develop targeted training and rehabilitation programs.

  • Further research is needed to confirm these findings and to explore the potential implications for cognitive training and rehabilitation.



Citation

Lewandowska, P., Jakubowska, N., Hryniewicz, N. et al. Association between real-time strategy video game learning outcomes and pre-training brain white matter structure: preliminary study. Sci Rep 12, 20741 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-25099-0

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